They’re Berry, Berry Good!

When it comes to a delightful trail side morsel of flavour you can’t beat a handful of wild strawberries in my neck of the woods. My favourites anyways, I wouldn’t change them if I could!





Today I’d like to write about one of my favorite wild edibles that grows in my area. Wild strawberries! These tiny bundles of flavour have been a target of mine since I was a small child. It is incredible to me how much sweetness can be packed into a single little berry.

In my yard we have an area devoted to Saskatoon berries and in amongst the grasses around these are thousands of wild strawberry plants. They can form as wee little round berries or as long thimble sized and any size in between. This one patch that I keep my eye on in front of a big spruce tree has an incredible flavour. Sweeter and stronger than the rest, they taste like lipton raspberry juice crystals. I swear!

I find that the Saskatoons and the strawberries are ripening at nearly the same time so as we go to check how far along our Saskatoons are we get to nibble on fresh wild strawberries too. And I’m not kidding when I say nibble. They are small, so small I have yet to try wild strawberry jam since it takes so many to fill a cup. Another issue is they don’t keep well to be able to stock up on a whole lot and they squish so terribly easily. I’m not sure if I will ever get enough past my children and in to the house to have them end up in jars. Our Jake is a berry fiend! Not the fellow to have come on a berry gathering trip… Unless you are fine with them being gathered in his belly of course. And of course I am thrilled he likes them too.

The two plants featured in my photos here were actually taken about 10 km south of my place at around a 1000 meters elevation. A bit higher than here at the homestead. They produce so heavily and have such sweet fruit I dug up a bunch to add to our special spot. Hopefully they will add to the genetics of our strawberries and improve yields. I only take a few when transplanting and since they grow everywhere in this valley I am not ruining the wild bounty for my neighbours at all.

They happily grow in the local minerals and I tend to find them in well drained soil. My area has a large amount of glacial till and often little topsoil. Regardless the wild strawberries still cover many areas and I would say they don’t need much to grow in way of organics, most of ours are only watered by natural rain fall growing in normally dry areas. Preferring to mix in with grassy patches and roadside ditches they make a perfect trail side snack for a burst of sugars, I am constantly picking/eating fruit as I go.

These little treasures will never take the place of our domestic strawberries in their garden. They unfortunately won’t be found in my freezer ever either to fill my steady need of frozen berries for our smoothie addictions. But when it comes to a delightful trail side morsel of flavour you can’t beat a handful of wild strawberries in my neck of the woods. My favourites anyways, I wouldn’t change them if I could!